Halloween Is For Kids

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There are two things that fall is known for. The first is today; rather, tonight. As a kid, Halloween was so much fun. We, or Dad, made our costumes from the American Girl magazine costume ideas. Just this morning he was complaining what a pain it was and I told him to quit playing coy—he knows he loved every minute of it.

But a fun holiday for kids—with Casper the Friendly Ghost and little boys dressed as Superman—turned ghoulish when adults started celebrating as much or more than kids. Now instead of ghosts and goblins you have zombies and gore. My mom likes those baking challenges on Food Network. I tried watching the Halloween one, but the channel was quickly changed. Typical of the holiday these days, the amount of blood and guts rivaled that of an operating room!

I remember being on candy patrol when I got too old to go trick-or-treating. Seeing the teenagers begging for candy was my Halloween pet peeve, but I didn’t dare not give them candy—they could have taken me on!

I guess what I’m saying is, if you’re old enough to trick-or-treat by yourself, you’re too old to celebrate Halloween.

Ok, It Wasn’t That Bad

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I went to a local community college. Though probably fifteen or more years ago, I still remember my first class: Children’s Literature 101. I love remembering the younger me who read The Boxcar Children, Ellen Tebbits, Nancy Drew, and the like.

I hoped we would have to read the books of my youth in class, although my eyes have a hard time tracking if a book isn’t enlarged, and the Kindle was still a few years away, so I got audio books. No; the first book was one I’d heard of, but didn’t have the slightest desire to read, or listen to. I saw the picture on the box of CDs: a boy with a wand and a cloak. I was filled with doom. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. Have I mentioned how much I hate fantasy? Worst of all, it was a huge box, probably containing eight CDs.

I’m an optimist, often to a fault. How bad could it be? Listening to a story about the orphan with magical powers. I kept thinking how the book wasn’t so bad. Okay, I survived! Though it’s not my favorite book, probably not even in the top 50, but it was definitely not what I was expecting. It’s corny, but I guess things—even fantasy books—deserve a chance.

Memories

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At a very young age I learned to love America. My elementary school was big on patriotism. We had school assemblies where we sang songs like “You’re a Grand Old Flag” and “America the Beautiful.” There were also memorization challenges: The Pledge of Allegiance probably in first grade and The Gettysburg Address in sixth, for example.

I credit Lincoln Alternative School with explaining, very clearly, ours rights as an Americans, and how voting is basically the best way of thanking the people who died for our rights.

Do you think our Founding Fathers would be happy with America today? It’s a question I think of while watching the news. I didn’t want this post to be a political debate, so I’ll keep my opinions to myself, but I’d love to hear from you.

Not Just For Kids

When anybody thinks of Dr. Seuss, they probably think of cats in hats. Perhaps an elephant named Horton who heard a Who, or a Grinch stealing Christmas. Reading those books at probably three or four years old, most likely on somebody’s lap, I was too young to appreciate the beauty of the rhymes I was hearing. Now at 34 I see that the words that were silly and fun are potentially life changing.

I was going to do a list of my ten favorites, but good ol’ Pinterest: They probably couldn’t decide either so they had to choose 30!

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