Time to Change

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I remember learning to tell time.  It was kindergarten, on a huge wooden clock, primary colored.  Mrs. Gibson would move the hands and the class had to guess which time she was showing.  I hated times like 9:23 and 2:14.  Even today, I round; 1:56 becomes 2.

Learning to tell time is almost a right of passage.  Only “grownups” know how to tell time.

You might have seen this on Facebook, how British schools are doing away with analog clocks in because the kids couldn’t read them.  It will be all digital.  ren’t kids at school to learn!?!

I bet American schools are next.  One of my Facebook friends is a teacher and said her kids can’t read an analog clock either. I’m sure my sister’s students are the same, too.

As for England, what’s next?  Will Big Ben become digital?

The Good And The Bad Of It

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I remember life without the internet and it was so simple. Almost quaint. I had a few pen pals and it was so much fun to shop for stationary and pens. Told you quaint!

But I don’t what I would do without the internet. Just ask my parents: it goes out and I go into crisis mode. Almost in a panic. I have no idea why, at the most it’s out for fifteen minutes.

But for something we all depend on, there is a dark, often dangerous, especially for kids, atmosphere to the internet. Think about hackers, cyberbullies, predators, and the like. I will be nervous for my nieces and nephews, imagining all they could be exposed to.

I found a website that is nothing like a lot of websites that report the bad news of the world. Liftable is a Christian website with dozens of news stories that will put you in a good mood.

I subscribe to their newsletter on Facebook and when I see an especially inspirational story, of course I need to share it.

Like most everything, the internet has it’s good points and bad—you just definitely need to know where to look. And where not to.