Time to Change

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I remember learning to tell time.  It was kindergarten, on a huge wooden clock, primary colored.  Mrs. Gibson would move the hands and the class had to guess which time she was showing.  I hated times like 9:23 and 2:14.  Even today, I round; 1:56 becomes 2.

Learning to tell time is almost a right of passage.  Only “grownups” know how to tell time.

You might have seen this on Facebook, how British schools are doing away with analog clocks in because the kids couldn’t read them.  It will be all digital.  ren’t kids at school to learn!?!

I bet American schools are next.  One of my Facebook friends is a teacher and said her kids can’t read an analog clock either. I’m sure my sister’s students are the same, too.

As for England, what’s next?  Will Big Ben become digital?

Good Job, Apple!

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Apple has done a sufficient job of making an emoji for everything possible. How they come up with them, I have no idea. I say I’m random! Do a boardroom full of Apple employees say the first thing that comes to their mind?

I saw on Facebook that for the new iPhone they thought of yet even more. At least proposed even more.

And drum roll: There will be emojis for people with disabilities! Some of them include a hearing aid, a cane, and two wheelchairs, manual and power. There will be an assistance dog and vest and prosthetic limbs.

The emojis were created in collaboration with such organizations as the National Foundation for the Blind, National Foundation for the Deaf, and The Multiple Sclerosis Society.

All I can say is, good job Apple. There are probably a million (if not millions) disabled iPhone users. I can speak from experience when I say these emojis are a tiny way of including a segment of the population who isn’t always included.

Your Philosophy Lesson For the Day

When Barbara Streisand talked about cloning her dog for $50,000, I thought she was joking. I know we love pets, but come on… Unfortunately Sarah got wind. She has a sick relationship with our family dog. She actually called Pippa her spirit animal and wants us all to contribute to cloning her. For $50,000.

Just because it fit in with the prompt, I looked into it.

The whole thing gives me the creeps, but is quite interesting—in a please-make-it-stop kind of way. Reading about Wolfie and Bubble, the first dogs this company cloned and their poster dogs (more like scruffy rats), I felt like I was getting a philosophy lecture, if not a theology lecture. What I got is they think it’s the first pet’s soul in the new pet. How far back can I roll my eyes?

What’s a gyp is that the company can’t guarantee the two animals will be exact copies. I thought of some questions. If they’re not identical, what if you like the clone better than the original dog? Will you spend ten-plus years feeling guilty? What happens when the clone dies? Do you get a clone of the clone and so on? See what I mean? Philosophy mixed with bioethics.

It all gives me the willies. Like thinking of infinity or space. At the rate science and technology are advancing, I can’t imagine what my ancestors will see. Cloned people? Okay, pets checked off the creepy list–at least compared to cloning people.